Angel’s Share

Carmen here! Another lounge review. This time a speakeasy styled lounge in the heart of NYC. After our dinner at Ippudo NY D.L. and I skidaddled over to Angel’s Share.

Ippudo NY blogpost

(https://foodifyme.wordpress.com/2011/08/22/ippudo-ny/)

Angel’s Share

Village Yokocho
8 Stuyvesant St
New York, NY 10003

Speakeasy styled places originated from the Prohibition period where people needed places to secretly get their drink on since drinking alcoholic drinks were illegal during that time. To decrease the chances of getting caught speakeasy places were hidden, secretive, and exclusive. This New York Times article accurately captures the essence of speakeasies.

New York Time article Bar? What Bar?

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/03/dining/03speak.html?pagewanted=all

“There’s no sign out front. The facade, an artfully casual assemblage of old wooden slats, gives the place a boarded-up, abandoned look. It does have a street number, painted discreetly on a glass panel above the front doors, but that’s it. Like a suspect in a lineup, it seems to shrink back when observed.

There are a lot of bars like this right now. They can be found all over the United States, skulking in the shadows. Obtrusively furtive, they represent one of the strangest exercises in nostalgia ever to grip the public, an infatuation with the good old days of Prohibition.”

Bar? What Bar? 

Though the speakeasy lounges available now are not illegal in the idea that they are serving illegal alcoholic drinks, but they try to imitate the mysterious and secretive qualities of a real speakeasy. And that is exactly what Angel’s Share did.

secret door that leads to Angel's Share

One would not know how to get to Angel’s Share unless they knew where it was located, and what door to take to get there. Angel’s Share is located inside an unmarked door of a Japanese restaurant. There are no signs or advertisements that  tell you that awaiting behind the door is the magic of a place that will take you far away from real life and into the world of imagination and fantasy. A world where things are hush hush and classiness is the norm.

Angel’s Share definitely delivered. There are 3 simple rules to Angel’s Share.

1. No more than 4 people.

2. No standing.

3. No screaming. No shouting.

Summer Breeze cocktail - Sorry for the bad quality. I didn't want to use flash in Angel's Share

Break these rules, and you will be kicked out. These rules keep the quiet, conversation friendly ambiance of Angel’s Share. Go there not to get wasted, but to have a good time, sip on delicious drinks, and engage in conversations with good company. I had the Summer Breeze cocktail, and D.L. had the Earl Gray Infused Vodka. Both were very delicious! The Summer Breeze cocktail captured the essence of a tropical island vacation equipped with miles of beaches and crystal clear waters. Though a little on the pricey side (drinks are around $14) they are extremely well made and so good. For these types of places you are not just paying for your drink, but paying to lounge in an atmosphere that is unlike any other.

Mural above the bar. What whimsy...

The appeal about such a place is the secretive quality of it. Half the fun lies in actually finding and getting into these places whether it is opening secret doors, entering in through sketchy alley ways, or saying the password to the person at the door. What is more attractive than the idea of something that is illegal or forbidden? There is a speakeasy where you drink cocktails from a teacup and beer in a brown paper bag to disguise the fact that what you are drinking is indeed alcohol. How whimsical.

On the quest to find more speakeasies.

Stars – 5/5

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2 thoughts on “Angel’s Share

  1. […] Read my blogpost about Angel’s Share, a speakeasy in NYC – https://foodifyme.wordpress.com/2011/08/23/angels-share/ […]

  2. […] easy styled bars round two. I wrote a blog post a while ago about my experience at Angel’s Share. Since then I have been a big fan of speak easy styled bars. There’s just something so […]

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